Not Skirting the Issue

The summer holidays bring a gnawing in the pit of your stomach. Two ‘Judgement Days’ are looming. You’ll not sleep the night before, you’ll need no alarm, and the adrenalin will be pumping. It’s Results Day.

Thankfully, students and staff did amazingly – I know every press release says that – but they really did. I’ve been primed to talk to all and sundry about Jaguar apprenticeships, Russell Group, hard-won ‘4s’, but they’ve not been the hot topic. Instead, I’ve been talking skirts.

Skirts have never been my specialist subject – not my Mastermind first pick – but as a school we made a change and this term saw D-Day. Our new school skirts created a fuss, certainly a cost to parents, and I’d be lying if I said every child was over-enamoured. Even so, the girls (and parents) have been fantastic and I’ve had more compliments about the skirts than anything else. Sure, we’ve had great exam feedback, but the skirts are the show-stopper!

So was change worthwhile? Will new skirts make students safer? Bring better results? Well the simple answer is ‘No’, but often there isn’t a simple answer.

The summer saw the latest wave of our refurbishment programme. Does a painted wall bring more 9s? No. Does a smart, clean environment make work more pleasurable and show we mean business? Absolutely.

Every Year 10 and 11 student received a personalised Headteacher postcard? Does that guarantee exam success? No. Does it show that each student is unique, prized and cared for? Absolutely.

Does the new skirt mean everyone passes English and Maths? No. Does it instil pride, high expectations and bring a real buzz to the school year? Absolutely.

A school should pride itself on pursuing every marginal gain. Graft to nudge every individual over their line. Standing still as a school, accepting the status quo, resting on laurels or reputation, will only let a child’s education drift and fail badly. If a school isn’t relentless in championing their students’ education, then who is ?

So if you drop in on The Friary School’s Open Evening (24 September), you’ll hear the rallying cry to go again, to keep refreshing school life, and to continually move forward. Last year’s students shone, but next year’s need to shine brighter still, and fighting every child’s corner is a commitment not to be skirted.

Matt Allman
Headteacher
The Friary School

September 2019